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Human rights abuses in Uganda still a major concern

Human rights abuses in Uganda still a major concern www.whoownsafrica.com Human rights abuses in Uganda still a major concern www.whoownsafrica.com
Uganda police officers conftont students of Makerere university during their protest against the 15 percent tuition increment in Kampala, Uganda, on October 30, 2019.

Human rights abuses in Uganda continue to be a major concern, despite efforts to improve the situation. From extrajudicial killings and torture to restrictions on freedom of expression and assembly, violations of human rights persist in the country.

The government must address these issues and uphold the rights of its citizens in order to create a more just and equitable society. This article examines the current state of human rights abuses in Uganda and discuss potential solutions to this ongoing problem.

Human rights abuses in Uganda still a major concern www.whoownsafrica.com
Human rights abuses in Uganda still a major concern www.whoownsafrica.com

Human rights abuses in Uganda still a major concern

The ruling by Uganda’s Constitutional Court on the controversial Anti-Homosexuality Act 2023 has once again brought attention to the issue of human rights abuses in the country. While the court upheld most of the law, it did strike down certain sections that were found to violate the rights to health, privacy, and freedom of religion.

Despite this ruling, concerns about human rights abuses in Uganda remain high. The appointment of President Yoweri Museveni’s son, Gen. Muhoozi Kainerugaba, as the head of the country’s military has only added fuel to the fire. Many see this move as a way for President Museveni to groom his son as his successor, leading to fears of a dynastic succession plan.

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Gen. Muhoozi Kainerugaba himself is not without controversy, with his unpredictable and late-night tweets gaining international attention. The speculation and concerns surrounding the appointment of President Museveni’s son have only added to the existing worries about human rights in Uganda.

Freedoms of Expression and Assembly

The Constitutional Court’s decision to strike down sections of the Computer Misuse Act and Public Order Management Act is a significant step towards upholding democratic principles and ensuring that individuals can exercise their fundamental rights without fear of persecution.

The dismissal of charges against former presidential candidate Kizza Besigye, who was accused of inciting violence during protests against the government’s handling of inflation, is a positive development that highlights the importance of allowing peaceful dissent and protest in a democratic society. However, the fact that authorities continue to threaten and arrest protesters, journalists, and government critics is concerning and shows that there is still work to be done to fully protect these fundamental freedoms.

The arrests of activists protesting government corruption in Karamoja and female opposition parliamentarians demonstrating against police brutality demonstrate the need for greater respect for the rights of individuals to peacefully assemble and speak out against injustice. The suspension of an officer for attacking journalists covering a protest also underscores the importance of holding accountable those who violate the rights of others in the exercise of their duties.

The arrest of students protesting the East African Crude Oil Pipeline in front of Parliament building further highlights the challenges faced by those seeking to peacefully express their views on important public issues. The decision not to renew the agreement hosting the Office of the OHCHR in Uganda and the targeting of NGOs accused of promoting homosexuality and forced recruitment highlight the broader threats to freedom of expression and assembly in the country.

Oppression in Uganda 

In recent months, there have been numerous reports of opposition leaders and supporters in Uganda being targeted by the authorities for their political beliefs and activities. The crackdown on dissent has raised serious concerns about the state of democracy and human rights in the country.

One of the most recent incidents occurred on January 24, when 12 supporters of the opposition party National Unity Platform (NUP) were charged with organizing an “illegal assembly” in Jinja and remanded to prison. Just a few days later, NUP supporter Anthony Agaba, also known as Bobi Young, was remanded to prison on allegations of “spreading harmful propaganda.” These arrests are just a few examples of the seemingly systematic targeting of opposition figures in Uganda.

The situation escalated further when police released NUP supporter Hamza Isma Mubiru, also known as Sadam Sadat, after he had been missing for a month. Mubiru was reportedly captured by unidentified armed personnel and charged with terrorism. Additionally, eleven other NUP supporters were arrested, charged with terrorism, and remanded to prison in Kampala.

In a concerning move, the police also banned the NUP from holding meetings, citing allegations of causing “public disorder” and inciting violence and promoting sectarianism. This crackdown on the opposition party’s activities raises serious questions about the government’s commitment to political freedoms and democracy.

In a rare moment of accountability, Uganda’s High Court ordered former director of the Internal Security Organization (ISO) Frank “Kaka” Bagyenda and 14 ex-security personnel to compensate Musa Nsereko $74,000 for torturing and illegally detaining him for over a year without charge. This case serves as a stark reminder of the human rights abuses that have been perpetrated against political dissidents in Uganda.

Another troubling incident was the dropping of charges against 218 civilians who were arrested during a military raid on the palace of Charles Mumbere, the king of the Rwenzururu kingdom. The raid resulted in the death of over 100 people, including 15 children. The lack of accountability for these killings further underscores the need for greater respect for human rights in Uganda.

The fact that President Museveni has been in power for almost forty years and shows no signs of stepping down only adds to the uncertainty. While experts suggest that he is unlikely to relinquish power during his lifetime, the appointment of his son has intensified rumors and raised questions about the future of leadership in Uganda.

Overall, human rights abuses in Uganda continue to be a major concern, with the recent events only serving to highlight the need for greater attention and action on this issue. It is essential that the international community and human rights organizations continue to monitor the situation in Uganda and advocate for the protection of fundamental rights and freedoms for all individuals in the country.


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